Professor Arokia Nathan

Cambridge Touch Technologies, UK

Ultra Low Power Sensor Interfaces for IoT

Professor Arokia Nathan

This talk will review the integration of oxides and fully printable organics for newly emerging application areas related to wearables and the Internet of Things. We will discuss the critical design considerations to show how device-circuit interactions should be handled and how compensation methods can be implemented for stable and reliable operation. In particular, the quest for low power becomes highly compelling in wearable devices. We will discuss transistor operation in the different regimes, and review device properties when operated in the deep sub-threshold regime or in near-OFF state, addressing the pivotal requirement of low supply voltage and ultralow power leading to potentially battery-less operation.

Professor Takao Someya

University of Tokyo, Japan

Talk Title Coming Soon

Professor Takao Someya

 

Corne Rentrop

Project Leader
Hybrid Printed Electronics Group at the Holst Center, TNO

Fundamentals and applications of hybrid printed Electronics and how to integrate into flexible, stretchable and three-dimensional products.

Corne Rentrop

Hybrid printed electronics become more and more available to integrate electronics in specific form-factors at high volume and low costs. There is no shortage of hybrid printed electronics concept ideas and product prototypes related to automotive, healthcare, smart packaging and buildings. Also the available production capability and functionality maturity for realizing these products are emerging enabling testing in an operational environment for end-users, interested in this technology.

The talk discusses the available manufacturing techniques for hybrid printed electronics comprising of state-of-the-art printing steps, electrical component assembly, post-processing steps, product integration steps and (electrical) characterisation methods.

The talk will be suplemented with manufacturing examples of high volume production prototypes at available pilot lines at the Holst Centre. On top of that we take a look at available methods for integrating electronics in 3D applications. In-mould electronics, and 3D printing are such foreseen technologies.